Why is BACP stifling discussion and debate?

Recent days have seen something of a furore in response to BACP’s 2017 Audit Consultation, which is being run to a very tight deadline – it closes at 5pm on Monday 30th January. Find the survey here: https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/BACPAudit

We know from anecdotal evidence that BACP members are checking out whether they can join another professional body.  Others have resigned or are threatening to do so. Reactions are fiercer than over proposals for either the regulation of counselling and psychotherapy by the Health Professions Council in 2009/10, or BACP’s review of its Ethical Framework in 2014.

These BACP members clearly appreciate the seriousness of the situation. Yet the deadline for responses is very much shorter than in 2014’s Ethical Framework consultation – in this case, just three weeks. This timescale strongly suggests that BACP are trying to pre-empt proper discussion.

Members are telling us they have written to BACP’s journal, Therapy Today, but have been informed that – instead of publishing the letters – BACP wants all correspondence about the survey to be forwarded to the register department, which is where responses to the consultation are being collated. In any event, due to the publication schedule, no letters on the issue could have been appeared in Therapy Today before the consultation closed – but BACP are still preventing members’ concerns reaching the pages of the next issue.

Why? Is BACP determined to present its own conclusions before wider concerns about context or implications have been properly aired? What’s going on?

The questions in the survey don’t invite comment about these wider implications – the final question is a narrow one that simply asks for suggestions on how ‘the audit process’ could be improved. No space is provided where any questions about the underlying rationale can be put, or where any reservations about the process as a whole can be expressed. It’s as though each and every suggestion is regarded as a potential incremental ‘improvement’ on the status quo. The fact that a major change of direction for BACP is being proposed is not acknowledged. That there is no opportunity to make any observations about this raises the possibility that the organisation is trying to slip major change through without proper input from its membership.

At the very least BACP needs to undertake a thorough analysis that weighs up the potential benefits of any proposed changes and set these against any possible unintended negative consequences. This should be done with transparency and with full membership participation – not after BACP managers have already presented their views and their interpretation of the survey results.

“the impression is that BACP regards its members as inherently untrustworthy”

As the Alliance has pointed out, what BACP is proposing is a regulatory framework based on distrust. During the 2014 review of the Ethical Framework, it was emphasised time and again that clients have to be able to trust BACP registrants. Indeed, BACP placed trustworthiness at the very heart of the new Ethical Framework:

‘Therefore, as members or registrants of BACP, we take being trustworthy as a serious ethical commitment’, it says in the opening pages.

Yet the impression from this consultation survey is that BACP regards its members as inherently untrustworthy, so much so they are badly in need of extra monitoring and surveillance. When the Ethical Framework was first introduced in 2001 as a replacement for the previous Code of Ethics, it was argued that the time had come to treat counsellors and psychotherapists as mature professionals. The impression in 2017 is that BACP members are not grown-ups at all but a bunch of potentially naughty schoolchildren who constantly need someone looking over their shoulder.

It beggars belief that such fundamental change is being presented via what is essentially a tick-box survey with further boxes in which comments can be added but which are hard to revise – both because so little text is visible in the space available and because scanning back to revisit earlier comments is so tedious. It’s as though obstacles have been deliberately placed in the way of anyone wishing to make more than perfunctory observations. We were told this survey ‘should take no longer than 20 to 25 minutes’, but a thoughtful response requires much more time than that.

In short, have we already witnessed a managerial coup at BACP HQ that is eager to suppress proper discussion and debate about these matters?

 

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One thought on “Why is BACP stifling discussion and debate?”

  1. I am appalled at the direction the BACP is taking. It most definitely does not exist for the benefit of its members. It seems to believe that it’s members are untrustworthy infants who have to be kept under tight control. It has become shaming and anxiety inducing. If I could join another professional body I would, but where I work membership of the BACP is a requirement and my training path is not a simple direct one. That the BACP is the organisation most in the public awareness and membership acts as a portal to other organisations means it really does feel like they have us by the short and curlies!

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